The Haworth Experience (BSP Blog Post 5)

On Monday, I got the opportunity to visit and explore Haworth, a quaint village on the English moors. This is where Emily Bronte grew up and got the inspiration to write Wuthering Heights. Overall, I had a wonderful time. I loved being able to hike the moors, even though the path was uneven and oftentimes slippery and the wind was wuthering. It was actually this experience that made me realize just how much Emily Bronte’s surroundings would have inspired her novel. The overcast sky and overall isolated atmosphere create the perfect setting for a Gothic novel. As I was walking the moors, I often got behind the group. It was creepy because other than coming upon another person hiking or the sheep that roam freely, the moors feel deserted. It feels like it is only you and nature. Reading Wuthering Heights gave a similar feeling. As I read the novel, Emily described a place of isolation and loneliness. This is exactly how I felt while hiking. However, I also saw the beauty of the landscape surrounding me. I cannot think of anything quite like what I saw. It was such a mixture of terrains. There were meadows and fields and forest-like areas that were pleasant, but there were also rocky areas and grasses so tall someone could be lurking in them without your knowledge that were discomforting.

During the visit, I also was able to tour the Bronte parsonage, which was amazing. I loved all of the items they had that actually belonged to the family, including letters, drawings, and little books they wrote as children. However, the items that stood out to me the most were the first editions of the girls’ books. They had a first edition of Wuthering Heights, as well as Jane Eyre. The most striking feature of these books was the pseudonyms that were on the books: Ellis Bell and Currer Bell. It was fascinating to see these in person.

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